No grain, no pain!

April 16, 2010

Back in the hunter and gatherer days, humans survived completely on what we could find/kill. This made our diet primarily Meat, Vegetables, Fruit and nuts. Food would spoil a few days after it was picked or killed, forcing us to spend all of our time looking for food. The winter months would be trying times as the plants died, animals were scarce and if your tribe couldn’t find food, your tribe died out.

Potatoes, Grains and legumes (peanuts, beans) could not be eaten by the paleolithic people because in their raw form they have so many toxins in them. Eventually, it was discovered that these foods could be ridden of enough toxins to make them edible, by merely heating them up. Note that this process does not remove all toxins, just enough to not kill you.

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Bad potatoes

April 16, 2010

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Hunter-gatherers

April 16, 2010

The Hadza do not engage in warfare [although they do have homicide]. They’ve never lived densely enough to be seriously threatened by an infectious outbreak. They have no known history of famine; rather, there is evidence of people from a farming group coming to live with them during a time of crop failure. The Hadza diet remains even today more stable and varied than that of most of the world’s citizens. They enjoy an extraordinary amount of leisure time. Anthropologists have estimated that they “work”—actively pursue food—four to six hours a day. And over all these thousands of years, they’ve left hardly more than a footprint on the land.

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Low-carb diets reduce oxidative stress

April 16, 2010

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Carb junkies

April 16, 2010

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Who can you trust?

April 15, 2010

Doctors, drugs and money

From 2000 through 2006, Dr. Nemeroff received just over $960,000 from Glaxo, but reported to Emory that he received no more than $35,000. Read full article here


Ancel Keys

April 15, 2010

Finally the New York Times comes up with a halfway decent review of Gary Taubes’ book Good Calories, Bad Calories. In yesterday’s Science section John Tierney (obviously not a member of the Kolata/Brody/Burros coven) takes a serious look at Gary’s book and what it has to say about the mainstream medical/nutritional establishment’s recommendation to follow a low-fat diet.

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